Dating mexican made telecaster

NOTE : The information below should be current as of the 2009 model year.One of the most confusing guitars for the novice guitar buyer to consider is the Fender Stratocaster (aka Strat). This is not intended to enlighten experts so please keep that in mind while reading.Mid–1997 the CIJ logo was the only one used on Fender guitars coming out of Japan (with exception the Squire series). I really don’t know, but the MIJ logo Fenders were for the USA market.USA Fender wanted to stop the import of these guitars to the USA due to firing up their Mexican plant and due to the “too good” quality Japan was creating which competed with the USA models.There are so many different variants of the Stratocaster being produced by Fender (or Fender licensed entities) that it's nearly impossible for first time buyers to have any idea what the differences are or why there are so many in the first place. But I believe I've learned enough during my own experiences to be of some assistance and guidance to those just starting out in this endeavor.For the sake of simplicity, I'm just going to talk about the most common recent production Stratocasters.My experience: I've played the same Mexico strat for 15 years now.It's now a bit beaten-up looking and I've worn the frets low with use, and I love it.

It’s Fender’s attempt to make sure that every human being on the planet can own something with their name on it.Fender bought a factory in Mexico, slapped their name on it, and now they kick out versions of their most popular guitars, the Telecaster and the Stratocaster faster than Hostess kicks out Twinkies and Cupcakes.Moving past my comparison of the most famous guitars to cream-filled snack foods, most of these Fender Mexico guitars, aren’t really discussed on the Internet.There aren’t many contemplatory posts in the comment sections, just 30 words, more or less, explaining 1 of the 2 aforementioned categories.So, now that that’s out of the way, lets get to it.So, to fill the void that exists due to reviewers penchant for trying to keep guitars like expensive jewelry instead of something like a toaster oven, I will write about this guitar in detail, so you can read it before you go to a Music store or a music website.I’m not going to deny the power of a music website’s comment section, but for the most part, if you read those you will read only one of two types of reviews: the person who is so happy about their instrument that they can’t be quiet about it, or the person who is so angry at their instrument that they too, can’t be quiet about it.For instance, many of the MIJ/CIJ Telecasters have the serial number on the bridge and they start with an "A".Yet if you take the neck off they can be 1994-1997!Regarding quailty, I have owned many of both these Japanese guitars and it is a fallacy that the than the Mexican made guitars and rival many of the USA models.The JV and SQ guitars, as well as some of the E series, had USA parts (mostly pickups, switches, and potentiometers) that were shipped over to Japan to help speed up production while the new USA plant was being set up in Corona, California.

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